Plastic bottles and bottle tops are one of the biggest sources of plastic pollution in our oceans, with 16 million bottles dumped in the UK every single day.

Coca-Cola produces 100 billion throwaway plastic bottles each year – and billions of these end up on beaches, in landfill and in the sea.

https://secure.greenpeace.org.uk/page/speakout/ocean-plastic?js=false&source=em&subsource=20170407ocem01&utm_source=gpeace&utm_medium=em&utm_campaign=20170407ocem01&tysource=9E139

http://act.greenpeace.in/oceans/defend-the-amazon-reef

https://www.mercycorps.org.uk/u/donate-tripadvisor

http://news.sky.com/story/head-of-sky-news-john-ryley-why-were-launching-sky-ocean-rescue-and-getting-rid-of-disposable-plastic-in-our-canteens-10739990

But is all this plastic Coca-Cola’s responsibility? As the world’s biggest soft drinks company, it’s no exaggeration to say that by changing the way they use plastic, Coca-Cola have the power to change the whole industry.

We’ve delivered a 2.5 tonne piece of artwork to Coca-Cola’s HQ today to show them it’s time to take real responsibility for their plastic pollution.

We’re calling on the soft drinks giant to embrace reusable packaging and ditch throwaway plastic. In the meantime, there’s no reason why Coca-Cola bottles shouldn’t be made of 100% recycled content (as opposed to the current 7%).

Rather than reducing its plastic footprint, Coca-Cola is actually increasing its use of throwaway plastic bottles. [1] But whether it’s red bottle tops in seabirds’ stomachs, tiny pieces of broken-down plastic entering our food chain, or those familiar bottles washed up on beaches – our oceans can’t stomach any more plastic.

http://www.climatecentral.org/news/rapid-climate-change-arctic-21389

Antarctica’s Blood Falls mapped and analyzed a century after discovery

https://www.theprintroom-gloucester.com/t-shirts

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The Art Conference #06: Urban Art as a Catalyst for Environmental Awareness

The Roundtable Edition x D&AD Festival

On the 26th of April, TAC: The Roundtable Edition will curate a much-needed debate concerning the creation of art for the purposes of inspiring environmental awareness and action, bringing together the unique perspective and approach of speakers embedded in global initiatives.

The dramatic changes that lie ahead, and the most pragmatic ways of dealing with the current environmental situation, will be discussed by founder of Human Nature Charlotte Webster, manager of O N C A Lu-Lu Evans, mural artist Louis Masai and director of Moniker Art Fair Tina Ziegler, hosted by TAC’s Doug Gillen, founder of Fifth Wall TV.

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